lördag 10 mars 2012

Treating traumatic stress and PTSD with ear acupuncture and acupuncture in Chinese medicine; a look at NADA and the basics of PTSD

Sometimes in life things happen that are too far beyond what we should have to witness or go through. But these things still happen. Sometimes it affects us only in the short run, but sometimes it stays in the long run too: problems or memories we can´t quite forget as much as we want. This is an area where good chinese medicine acupuncture or ear acupuncture can help a lot.

Different levels of stress can be treated and relieved both through chinese medicine acupuncture and through the newer version of ear acupuncture that has spread in the West. In this article we are going to look at how they do this, what different levels of stress they can treat – job stress, traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) – and also a bit about how classical chinese medicine views this kind of treatment with shen, the mind, and how it links to our physical health. We have made this a tandem post translated into Swedish, since one of our projects is with ear acupuncture for abused women. Om du vill läsa om hur man kan behandla traumatisk stress och PTSD med akupunktur och öronakupunktur, så har du länken till vår blogpost här: http://acupractitioner21.blogspot.com/2012/03/oronakupunktur-och-akupunktur-for-att.html

I have treated women who have been beaten and abused, social services staff, and ambulance (EMT) staff fresh in from a bad shift. In all these cases I have seen how much the treatment can do to help them release and become free from the experiences they have been through. It let them find peace right now in the short run, but also to release the trauma out of their body and mind so it didn´t coagulate and affect their health – and life – in the long run.

There are moments that are made up of too much stuff for them to lived at the time they occur.”
John Le Carré, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy


Traumatic stress, acute stress and PTSD

Stress is a normal facet of life – and the techniques mentioned here are also regularly used just to dissolve and release a week´s stress from work for many patients. But sometimes our life includes shocks, disasters, crime, or other events that are so strong that they imprint more deeply in us. Some examples of this kind of level of stress are (but not limited to): rape, physical, sexual or mental abuse, threat, bullying, severe illness, natural disaster, sexual abuse as a child, witnessing the death or injury of others etc.

All stress reactions to these kinds of events are natural for us. We should react to them. Problems only arise if the reactions stay with us too much and start shaping our everyday life.
A short-term reaction to events like these is called acute stress reaction. We can simply use the text from Wikipedia here. If the reaction stays, it then starts to become diagnosed as posttraumatic stress disorder: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder). For those interested, there is a selected reading list for sufferers and practitioners alike at the end of this post.

Posttraumatic stress disorder is classified as an anxiety disorder, characterized by aversive anxiety-related experiences, behaviours, and physiological responses that develop after exposure to a psychologically traumatic event (sometimes months after). Its features persist for longer than 30 days, which distinguishes it from the briefer acute stress disorder. These persisting posttraumatic stress symptoms cause significant disruptions of one or more important ares of life function. It has three sub-forms: acute, chronic and delayed-onset.”

This must have involved both a) loss of ”physical integrity”, or risk of serious injury or death, to self or others, and b) response to the event that involved intense fear, horror, or helplessness (or in children, the response must involve disorganized or agitated behaviour). (The DSM IV-R criterion differs substantially from the previous DSM III-R stressor criterion, which specificed the traumatic event should be of a type that would cause ”significant symptoms of distress in almost everyone,” and that the event was ”outside the range of usual human experience.”

Typical symptoms of PTSD are flashbacks or intrusive thoughts of what happened during the event; avoidance of things related to the event or similar situations; nightmares; phobias, feeling of guilt, hypervigilance (constantly on guard), distrust that sometimes can grow into paranoia, exaggerated startle response (jumping or reacting very strongly to movements or sounds), anger, depression, numbing of reaction or feelings to other things in life, etc. Not all sufferers have all of these. For a more complete list, recommended is checking on the web or David Kinchin´s book that we talk about below.

Some people have lighter PTSD, some more severe; either way, it makes daily life dominated by an event or events. For those who have PTSD really bad, they live in hell every day, often without having keys to get out.

If the person develops PTSD, this can be of three different kinds: primary, secondary and tertiary PTSD.
  Primary PTSD is for the person it happens to. Secondary is for family of victims, who often either see things happen themselves or have to deal too much with a relative or loved one who suffers from PTSD. Tertiary PTSD can happen to witnesses of the event. Versions of these three can also happen to professionals; police, social services, aid workers, medical staff etc., the carers who might not be directly involved but face traumatized people too much, or who listen a lot to descriptions of traumatic events and see it on the people telling them until they get it too.

There are two main ways of getting PTSD. The first is the obvious one of a specific event happening, and then maybe leaving more long-term problems instead of leaving the person. The second is what used to be called PDSD: Prolonged Duress Stress Disorder, which is PTSD, just PTSD built up through smaller events but over a long time. This might be from someone living under threat, or for the social worker who seems to finally hear that one story too many – it wasn´t that story, it was many years of stories before. Often there is a seemingly smaller event that triggers the landslide of older things that were building up before. This version can often get reactions like ”Why do you react so badly to this? It´s not that bad, is it?”.

The amount of people who get PTSD after traumatic events vary a bit depending on what the event was – rape victims, 35-50%, shipwreck survivors, 75%, sexual abuse victims 50%, while the figures for bullying have been revised quite a lot over the last few years, as bullying for both children and adults can create PTSD too. (see Kinchin, 2001).

Formal diagnosis of acute stress reaction and PTSD is usually up to a psychiatrist. There are a lot of politics involved in how the diagnostic model is designed (see Ronson´s The Psychopath Test (2012) for one chapter talking about how the DSM came about and the strangely haphazard way diagnostic criteria at least could be made in it back then). You can read a discussion of the evolution of the criteria in Posttraumatic stress disorder – a comprehensive text (Edited by Saigh et al, 1999). Pages 5-8 discusses the evolution through different editions of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatry, the DSM III, DSM III-R och DSM IV and DSM IV-R. Recently DSM V was published, and there are other changes in that. For further information on this, you can find a lot of discussions on the Web.

The best book for those suffering from PTSD is David Kinchin´s Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – the invisible injury (2001). It is written in simple language to make it easier to read for someone who has the kind of concentration-problems PTSD can give. Kinchin, an ex-police officer, suffered from PTSD himself, and wrote the book for those who have it, with an insider´s understanding of what is needed.

Treatment of traumatic stress and PTSD in Western medicine

Most common treatment with long-term problems or PTSD in Western medicine is often limited to three options: 1) medication (often Zoloft, or similar mood-stabilisers and anti-depressants), 2) therapy, 3) CBT, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Most sufferers would ideally need all three. There is also a technique called EMDR, Eye-movement Desensitization and reprocessing, which has been used very successfully to remove the charge in images from a traumatic event and make the person more free of them. See:



Treatment of traumatic stress and PTSD through chinese medicine acupuncture and ear acupuncture

Treatment of traumatic stress through acupuncture has been systemized and used world-wide by the aid organisation Acupuncturists Without Borders, where I am a member. For more about their work, see http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/.

The easiest version of helping someone that has been through traumatic stress is through ear acupuncture, the version that was created in the West and is called the NADA protocol.
Ear acupuncture is mentioned in the old classics, but seems to have been lost as a system over the centuries. It was researched and discovered again by Nogier, who is the father of it here in the West. (And who also, incredibly enough, was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physiology – for acupuncture. He never got it, but was nominated in 1950). Then, in the 1980´s, a group of psychologists created what is now called the NADA protocol: five needles on the surface of each ear, inserted shallowly, and retained for 30-40 minutes.

The NADA protocol is very effective, especially for calming down and relaxing people. It seems to have a greater effect directly on the nervous system than normal acupuncture. It has less health effects than chinese medicine acupuncture, of course, but its ability to create relaxation and calm down the mind is fast, soft, and effective.

One of the very good things of using ear acupuncture to treat traumatic stress or PTSD is that it´s a completely non-verbal treatment. In many cases, the patient will either find it difficult to talk about what happened, not want to, not remember, or sometimes not be able to reach memories of the event. The ear acupuncture will work incredibly well with no communication about what happened at all. And after treatments, the patient will feel more relaxed in themselves and safer than before, which makes them more able to continue with therapy.
Another useful thing about ear acupuncture when it comes to traumatized patients is that during treatment you just sit dressed in the same clothes, on a chair. Many people who were traumatized can have a phobic fear of feeling vulnerable or even slightly powerless, and sitting on a chair fully dressed instead of half-dressed on a treatment table can make a big difference to that feeling of control as treatments start.

Here you can see volunteers from Acupuncturists Without Borders) use NADA ear acupuncture during one of their projects in New Orleans, after hurricane Katrina.




Time-frame for treatment of acupuncture for trauma and PTSD

As soon as possible. Same goes for contact with psychiatry or therapy, or simply talking things through with a good friend after a traumatic event. If it has been a very traumatic event, describing it to a friend might actually hurt them too, so remember to be careful about their health. A very traumatic event really needs contact with a professional therapist afterwards, preferably someone actually trained in dealing with PTSD. The faster the treatment, the less the shock and memory stays in the system. The longer we wait, the more risk there is for any trauma that still might be left to go deeper in us and start shaping our personality and the way we see the world.

Ear acupuncture really helps to release people´s nervous system and calm their mind, giving them peace that they can be desperate to feel. Chinese medicine acupuncture will be more complete in treating the entire system, emotions and the physical health, say if someone has had PTSD or shock for a longer time and there is more wear and tear on their body and mind. Ear acupuncture, however, has the useful ability of treating more patients at the same time, up to 10-20 or more, depending on size of room, which gives the patients a support network of others that they share that peace and healing with.

Acupuncturists Without Borders were founded on this idea: founder Diana Fried saw hurricane Katrina rip New Orleans apart, and wished she could help out – until she realized that she could, using her acupuncture skills. The aid organisation has since treated 7000 people in and around New Orleans, as well as uncountable veterans, police, and people involved in disasters all over the US, and the first responders who work in them.

Just one treatment can make a big difference if the trauma is very recent, but treating trauma or PTSD is long-term, and the standard treatment of six sessions for normal acupuncture will rarely be enough. This will of course depend on the patient and their health. The acupuncturist and their clinic will still be there as a fixpoint the sufferer can begin to trust, and if therapy gets tough or they have a bad week, they know that the treatment really helps and still is there, which in itself gives added security to their life.

An important note here is for the patient to have a stable connection with a therapist jointly with the acupuncture treatment, and ideally of course to have some kind of support network among friends and family. Sometimes this can´t be arranged, but ideally they should be in place. And ear acupuncture can be used very well in adjunct to on-going therapy for trauma or PTSD.


The intent of the practitioner when using acupuncture to treat trauma or PTSD

As practitioner, it´s important for us to have a great gentleness when approaching someone who has been through traumatic events or who has PTSD from before. We are standing before someone who has been through more bad times than anybody would want, and we have the skill to help the fragments of their being become more whole again. Even if we want to rephrase this, we stand there and have the skill to give some peace that they are desperate for, yet don´t have tools to create for themselves.

Remember that you might need to move and talk a bit differently with someone who has PTSD, as they often are much more sensitive to external triggers than other patients, due to the events they have been through. Respect this, and be gently careful while helping them heal.


The junior physician treats the disease according to the condition of the body, while the senior physician treats the disease according to the condition of the spirit.”
                - Huangdi Neijing Lingshu, Chapter 1, Nine Needles and Twelve Yuan Source Points


Classical Chinese Medicine and the view of the mind affecting the body

Chinese medicine has treated problems in the mind at least as far back as 300 BC, when the first references are found in text in the first medical textbook called the Huangdi Neijing, the Yellow Emperor´s Classic of Internal Medicine (see Wu and Wu, 1997).

For those practitioners interested in the newer TCM patterns for PTSD and trauma, an overview can be found in The Treatment of PTSD with Chinese Medicine – an integrative approach, (Chang et al., 2010). Classical Chinese Medicine (CCM) would have a slightly different approach, but both versions can be very effective in helping someone heal who has been traumatized or who have gone on to the smaller group that develops PTSD for a shorter or longer time.

Daoism, the spiritual tradition which Chinese medicine has grown from and which has shaped it in many ways, has talked about treating the mind and spirit since at leat 350 BC too (probably much longer, but those are the earliest extant sources in text). For those interested in this link and how it then is mirrored in the Neijing, Nanjing, Li Shizhen´s work on the Eight Extraordinary meridians (for a more modern view on this, see Applied Channel Therapy of Chinese Medicine, Robertson and Wang, 2008), can be recommended to start reading the oldest manuscript we have of Daoists texts, the Neiye, the Classic of Internal Cultivation (Roth, 1999).

Lighter versions of the Daoist knowledge has spread through qigong, Tai Chi and meditation here in the West. Studies and work has been done in using Tai Chi to heal PTSD, and several of these modalities can really help stabilize both the physical health and heal the mind. A personal account of dealing with severe PTSD through this kind of training can be found in Vietnam veteran Lee Burkins´s book Soldier´s Heart (2002).

Some practitioners use the so-called guixue to treat PTSD – these are the Ghost Points of Sun Simiao, a legendary acupuncture doctor who lived during the Tang dynasty (ca 700 AD). Using these would, in my experience, be inadvisable until treatment was quite advanced, but it always depends on the health and stability of the patient. The Ghost Points are used to release and free us from strong emotional or mental garbage and obsessions, and it is important that the person is stable first, which someone with PTSD usually is not until their health and life has been stabilized. Someone with severe PTSD can be very fragile, and treatments need to be gentle to build up a stable base for them to work from. For a brief look at the Ghost Points used with moxa, see Moxibustion: a modern clinical handbook, (Wilcox 2011).


Summing up

Life sometimes contains experiences that mark us too hard. This can be healed, we can become more whole again; not like we were before what happened, because whatever it was will stay happened whether we like it or not. But we can become healed in that it doesn´t affect our everyday life or control our thoughts: instead we can make it a strength that we build on and move forward from. Alloys are often stronger than iron.

Ear acupuncture and acupuncture is one way of helping someone who is traumatized, or someone who has developed PTSD. It is practical, concrete, and requires no verbalization of events or feelings. With ear acupuncture, it can also be given while just sitting on a chair dressed in our regular clothes. The practitioner gently inserts five needles along each ear, very shallowly, and then we sit there for half an hour. Then we get up, with a whole new peace and relaxation inside.

If you have any questions on this article or about treating PTSD and trauma with acupuncture or ear acupuncture, you can contact me at acu@smallchange.se. For sources, links and bibliography, see below. For the brilliant work done by Acupuncturists Without Borders in this field, see http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/.


For every needling, the method is above all not to miss the rooting in the spirit.”
            - Rooted in Spirit, Chapter 8 of the Neijing, the Heart of Chinese Medicine, Larre and Rochat de la Vallée, Station Hill press 1995



Articles and links:




Acupuncturists Without Borders work with nation-wide programs in the US to heal and dissolve traumatic stress in patients, veterans and people who have been through natural disasters. They also regularly treat the first responders who go in to help out in the disaster zones. Their website is http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/



Bibliography and selected reading


A very interesting paper on the subject of NGO security, security for aid workers. I believe that good Acceptance will decrease the risk for PTSD in aid workers.

Activist sustainability – hållbar hälsa för aktivister och frivilliga, Daniel Skyle, 2011, Swedish version http://www.smallchange.se/activistsustainabilitydanielskyle, english version at
Paper on activist sustainability, with some comparisons and guidelines.

Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine, Robertson and Wang, Eastland Press, 2008
Brilliant book, and comments on the use of the Eight Extraordinary meridians in treating emotions and the nervous system.

A war of nerves – soldiers and psychiatrists 1914-1994, Ben Shephard, Jonathan Cape, 2000
Historical overview of the concept of PTSD and how the military has treated (or ignored) it since the 1800´s.

CARE International Safety and Security Handbook, CARE, 2004

Choke – the secret to performing under pressure, Sian Beilock, Constable&Robinson 2010

Episodes in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Bai Jingfeng, Panda Books, 1998
Good biography of Sun Simiao, re his Ghost Points.

Extreme Fear – the science of your mind in danger, Jeff Wise, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010

Laughing Saints and Righteous Heroes: emotional rythm in social movement groups, Erika Effler, Morality and Science Series, 2010
One of the first and only books on how emotional rythms move and change groups of volunteers, along with the pressure this puts on their health, what is called activist sustainability.

NGO Security Conference 2010, with interview with anti-kidnapping specialist Suzanne Williams, Daniel Skyle, www.smallchangengosecurityblog.blogspot.com
Re PTSD in kidnapped aid workers. For ideas of treatment, besides this blogpost, see also Activist sustainability – hållbar hälsa för aktivister och frivilliga, Daniel Skyle, 2011, Swedish version http://www.smallchange.se/activistsustainabilitydanielskyle,

Moxibustion: a modern clinical handbook, Lorraine Wilcox, Blue Poppy Press, 2011

Nan-Ching, the Classic of Difficult Issues, Unschuld, University of California University Press, 1986

Neiye – Original Tao, Inward Training and the Foundations of Taoist Mysticism, Harold Roth, Columbia University Press, 1999.

NLP and Health, McDermott and O´Connor, Thorsons, 1996
Good book on how we can use our language and phrasing to ease healing in patients and with ourselves. This is especially important in PTSD-patients, as they often are very sensitive to external triggers.

On Combat – the psychology and physiology of deadly conflict in war and in peace, Dave Grossman, PPCT Research Publications, 2004

Operational Security Management in Violent Environments, Brabant et al, Good Practice Review 8 Revised (GPR 8 R), 2011
NGO security handbook, chapter discussing signs of stress and stress-injuries due to external events in conflict zones or disaster areas.

Perplexities to Acupuncture and Moxibustion – English- Chinese edition, Li Ding, Shanghai University of TCM Press, 2007
Includes chapter on treating the mind, shen, in Chinese medicine.

Posttraumatic stress disorder – a comprehensive text, Edited by Saigh, Bremner, Allyn and Bacon, 1999

Post traumatic stress disorder – the invisible injury, David Kinchin, Unlimited Success, new edition 2005
Best book on the market for people who have been through trauma or who suffer from PTSD.

Soldier´s Heart, Lee Burkins, 2002
Personal memoir of someone who suffered from extremly grave PTSD, and his way of healing that.

Sunzi´s Art of War and Health Care, Wu et al, New World Press, 1997
Several chapters on treating the mind and emotions, linked to Sunzi´s teaching on conflict and war.

Supporting Children with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – a practical guide for teachers and professionals, Brown and Kinchin, David Fulton Publisher, 2001
A simple yet very effective book for those working with children, including how to spot trauma and PTSD in children. Includes advice on how to deal with it and help them too.

Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber, Jingui Yaloue, Zhang Zhongjing, Chinese-English edition, New World Press 2007

Talking to the Enemy, Scott Atran, HarperCollins, 2010

The Beautiful Tree, James Tooley, Cato Institute, 2009
The Gift of Fear, Gavin de Becker, Random House, 1997

The Psychological Health of Relief Workers: some practical suggestions, Salama, Humanitarian Exchange Magazine, 1999, http://www.odihpn.org/report.asp?id=1043

The Psychopath Test, Jon Ronson, Picador, 2011
Includes chapter on how the DSM was created, with some worrying information on the (at least early) haphazardness of diagnostic criteria.

The Seven Emotions – psychology and health in ancient China, Larre and Rochat de la Vallée, Monkey Press, 1996

The Treatment of PTSD with Chinese Medicine – an integrative approach, Chang et al., People´s Medical Publishing House, 2010.
First and only book so far specifically on treating PTSD with modalities within Chinese medicine. Joe Chang works at Fort Bliss Restoration & Resilience Center William Beaumont Army Medical Center, US, Wang wei Dong is chief physican and professor, Department of TCM psychology, Guang´anmen Hospital of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China and Jiang Yong is Associate professor of chinese medcine, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China.
Interestingly, it includes case-studies of PTSD-treatment in Chinese hospitals from the Sichuan earthquake in 2006.

The Yellow Emperor´s Canon of Internal Medicine, Chinese-English edition, Wu and Wu, China Science and Technology Press, 1997

Understanding post-traumatic stress – a psychosocial perspective on PTSD and treatment, Joseph et al, Wiley, 1997


Daniel Skyle © 2012. Copyrighted material.

torsdag 8 mars 2012

Öronakupunktur och akupunktur för att läka traumatisk stress och posttraumatiskt stressyndrom, PTSD, om NADA, samt klassisk kinesisk medicins syn på att läka känslor

Ibland händer det saker i livet som vi inte borde behöva se eller uppleva. Men de händer ändå. Ibland kan de påverka oss i det korta loppet, men det händer att de fortsätter påverka oss i det långa loppet också: problem eller minnen som vi inte kan glömma riktigt så mycket vi vill. Detta är ett område där bra kinesisk medicin och öronakupunktur kan göra mycket för att hjälpa oss att läka och bli helare igen.

Olika grader av stress kan behandlas och lättas både genom den klassiska kinesiska akupunkturen och genom den nyare versionen av öronakupunktur som spridits här i Väst. I den här artikeln ska vi titta närmare på hur de gör detta, vilka grader av stress de kan behandla – alltifrån vanlig stress på jobbet till traumatisk stress eller posttraumatiskt stressyndrom (PTSD) – och till slut titta lite på hur klassisk kinesisk medicin ser behandlingar av shen, sinne och känslor, och hur det länkar till vår fysiska hälsa. Du kan också hitta den här blogposten översatt till engelska här på bloggen:

Jag har behandlat kvinnor som blivit misshandlade och genomgått övergrepp, traumatiserad personal inom Socialtjänsten och ambulanspersonal som kommit direkt till behandling efter ett tufft skift. I alla de fallen har jag sett hur mycket behandlingarna kan hjälpa dem lösa upp och bli fria från erfarenheterna de varit med om. Det lät dem hitta lite frid nu direkt, i det korta loppet, men också att släppa de traumatiska upplevelserna ur sitt sinne och kropp så att de aldrig hann börja koagulera och påverka deras hälsa – och liv – i det långa loppet.

Det finns ögonblick i livet som är fyllda av för mycket händelser för att vi ska hinna leva dem medan de sker.”
John Le Carré, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy


Traumatisk stress, akut stressreaktion och PTSD

Stress är en normal del av livet, och teknikerna vi nämner här används också hela tiden i kliniken för att bara lösa upp och bli fri från en veckas jobbstress. Men ibland innehåller livet också chocker, katastrofer, brott eller andra händelser som är så starka att de går djupare i oss. Några exempel på den nivån av stress är (men inte begränsat till): våldtäkt, fysiska, mentala eller sexuella övergrepp, hot, mobbing, svår sjukdom, naturkatastrofer, sexuella övergrepp som barn, att se andra skadas eller dödas etc.

Reaktioner på den här sortens stress är helt naturliga. Vi ska reagera på dem. Problem kan däremot uppstå om de stannar allt för länge i oss och börjar forma vårt dagliga liv.
En korttidsreaktion på den här sortens händelser brukar kallas akut stressreaktion. Vi kan helt enkelt använda citaten från Wikipedia här. Om reaktionerna stannar kvar efter en viss tid så ändras diagnosen ibland till posttraumatiskt stressyndrom. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder. För de som vill fördjupa kunskapen runt det finns det rekommenderade böcker och bibliografi i slutet på den här bloggposten.

Posttraumatic stress disorder is classified as an anxiety disorder, characterized by aversive anxiety-related experiences, behaviours, and physiological responses that develop after exposure to a psychologically traumatic event (sometimes months after). Its features persist for longer than 30 days, which distinguishes it from the briefer acute stress disorder. These persisting posttraumatic stress symptoms cause significant disruptions of one or more important ares of life function. It has three sub-forms: acute, chronic and delayed-onset.”

This must have involved both a) loss of ”physical integrity”, or risk of serious injury or death, to self or others, and b) response to the event that involved intense fear, horror, or helplessness (or in children, the response must involve disorganized or agitated behaviour). (The DSM IV-R criterion differs substantially from the previous DSM III-R stressor criterion, which specificed the traumatic event should be of a type that would cause ”significant symptoms of distress in almost everyone,” and that the event was ”outside the range of usual human experience.”


Symptom på PTSD

Typiska symptom på PTSD är flashbacks (att man ser bilder av eller återupplever det som hände under situationen); undvikande av saker som påminner om eller länkar till händelsen; mardrömmar, fobier, känslor av skuld, hypervigilans (hela tiden på vakt mot omgivningen), misstro mot andra (som kan utvecklas till paranoia), överdriven reaktion på yttre stimuli (att hoppa till eller reagera mycket starkt på rörelser eller ljud), ilska, depression, att känslomässiga reaktioner blir stummare, etc. Inte alla som lider av PTSD har alla dessa. För en mer komplett lista på symptomen se på nätet eller David Kinchin´s bok som vi rekommenderar nedan.

Tänk på att om du har varit med om någon händelse av den typen vi nämner här ovan så är det bästa att du tar kontakt med en terapeut, brottsoffersamordnare eller liknande. Att dra sig tillbaka från sociala kontakter och tappa intresse i saker man brukade tycka om är del av symptomen för PTSD, så det är hemskt bra att man har kontakt med en terapeut först så att man inte utvecklar PTSD-symptom utan att ha insikt i det själv, drar sig undan, och sakta blir allt sämre. Det går fortfarande och hjälpa och behandla och bli friare från dem, men då hinner det gå djupare och påverka ens liv ännu mer, vilket är onödigt.

Vissa får lättare version av PTSD, andra starkare. Vilken version det än är så domineras livet av tankar och känslor runt det som skedde. För de som har svår PTSD är det dagliga livet ett helvete de lever i varje dag, utan att hitta nycklarna för att ta sig ut. Det finns sätt att läka och bli friare också från svår PTSD; nycklarna existerar, även om de som är där sällan kan tro på det till en början.


Tre olika sorters PTSD

Om en person går vidare till att faktiskt få PTSD kan det vara av tre olika sorter: primär, sekundär eller tertiär PTSD.
  Primär PTSD är för personen som utsattes för händelsen. Sekundär är för familj till dem, som antingen såg saker själva eller måste ta hand om för mycket av den andres minnen och reaktioner, något som blir mycket svårare om man älskar dem. Tertiär PTSD kan skapas hos vittnen till en händelse. Versioner av de tre kan också hittas bland proffsen; polis, socialtjänst, vårdpersonal etc., de som tar hand om personerna som utsatts för trauma. De behöver inte vara direkt inblandade i händelsen men kan höra för mycket, se traumatiserade människor för ofta eller bara höra det återberättade och upplevt om och om igen tills de ibland utvecklar det själva. Inom den sortens jobb bör det alltid finnas stöd och system för debriefing, men det är inte alltid den strukturen fungerar som den ska.


Hur får man PTSD?

Det finns två huvudsakliga sätt att få PTSD. Det första är den uppenbara och klassiska i att vara med om en specifik händelse, som ibland inte släpper och lossar i oss som den ska utan stannar kvar och börja påverka oss i det långa loppet. Det andra är vad som brukade kallas PDSD: Prolonged Duress Stress Disorder, som också är PTSD, bara PTSD uppbyggt av många små ”mindre” traumatiska händelser under lång tid. Det kan vara för någon som lever under hot, för socialarbetaren som hör en berättelse för mycket – och det var inte den berättelsen, det var de gångna fem-tio åren av berättelser som till slut fick en utlösande faktor. Ofta är den sista händelsen till synes mindre men släpper loss lavinen av saker som legat i bakgrunden. Den versionen kan ofta få reaktioner som ”Varför reagerar du så starkt på just detta? Du har ju varit med om mycket värre, det här är väl inte så farligt?..”.

Mängden människor som får PTSD efter traumatiska händelser varierar en del beroende på vad händelsen var. Våldtäktsoffer, 35-50%; överlevande efter skeppsbrott, 75%; offer för sexuella övergrepp som barn, 50%; medan siffror för mobbing både för barn och vuxna har höjts rejält de gångna åren, då mobbing också kan skapa PTSD (see Kinchin, 2001).

Formell diagnos av akut stressreaktion och PTSD brukar behöva göras av en psykiater i Sverige. Det finns en hel del politik inblandad i hur diagnoskriterierna är utformade (se Ronson´s The Psychopath Test (2012) för ett kapitel om hur Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatry, som har listor på detta internationellt, skapades, och hur konstigt slumpmässiga diagnoskriterierna kunde sättas i den. Ytterligare politik runt diagnosen sker från Försäkringskassan och militära institutioner som vill begränsa sjukpensioner och behandlingar). Du kan läsa en längre diskussion om hur utvecklingen av diagnosen har skett i Posttraumatic stress disorder – a comprehensive text (Red. av Saigh et al, 1999.) Sidorna 5-8 diskuterar utvecklingen mellan olika utgåvor av DSM, från DSM III, DSM III-R och DSM IV till DSM IV-R. Nyligen publicerades DSM V och ytterligare ändringar har skett där. För de som är intresserade finns det mycket diskussioner runt det på webben. En intressant artikel på samma ämne är Post-traumatic stress disorder: The chameleon of psychiatry (Rosenbaum, 2004).

Bästa boken för de som har PTSD är David Kinchin´s Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – the invisible injury, (Success Unlimited 2001). Den är skriven i enkelt språk för att göra den lättare att läsa för de som har den sortens koncentrationsproblem som de med PTSD kan ha. Kinchin är en före detta polis som fick PTSD själv, och efter mycket forskning i ämnet skrev boken för de som har det, med kunskapen om vad som behövs när man har det själv.


Behandling i västerländsk medicin

Vanligaste behandling vid långvariga problem eller PTSD i västerländsk medicin brukar vara begränsad till tre möjligheter: 1) medicinering (SSRI-preparat typ Zoloft eller liknande), 2) samtalsterapi, 3) KBT, Kognitiv Beteendeterapi (tänk på att hitta någon som har full utbildning inom KBT, inte bara steg 1 eller kortare kurser). De flesta som har det behöver behandling genom alla tre. Det finns även en teknik som kallas EMDR, Eye-movement Desensitization and reprocessing, en teknik där man ofta med bra framgång kan ta väck laddning av bilder från händelsen. Se: http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMDR och http://www.sanktlukas.se/privatpersoner/emdr


Behandling av traumatisk stress och PTDS med akupunktur inom kinesisk medicin och med öronakupunktur

Behandling av traumatisk stress med akupunktur har systematiserats och använts internationellt av hjälporganisationen Acupuncturists Without Borders där jag är medlem. För mer om deras arbete, se http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/.

Den enklaste versionen av att hjälpa någon bli friare från en traumatisk upplevelse är via öronakupunktur, versionen som skapats i Väst och som kallas NADA.
Öronakupunktur nämns i de klassiska texterna inom kinesisk medicin men verkar ha tappats under årtusendena. Den återupptäcktes och forskades i av Nogier, som anses vara fadern för det i Väst (och som också, förbluffande nog, nominerades för ett Nobelpris för sina studier av akupunktur. Han fick det aldrig, men nominerades 1950.) Sedan, under 1980-talet, skapade en grupp psykologer i USA det som kallas NADA-protokollet: fem nålar som sätts i örat, mycket grunt, och som sedan sitter där för en behandling på 30-40 minuter.

NADA är mycket effektivt, speciellt för att lugna ner och slappna av den som blir behandlad. Det verkar ha mer effekt direkt på nervsystemet än vanlig akupunktur inom kinesisk medicin – och har förstås lägre hälsoeffekt och djup i behandling än vad akupunkturen i kinesisk medicin har i sin fulla version, men lugnar ner sinnet snabbt, mjukt och effektivt.

En av de bra sakerna med öronakupunktur för att behandla PTSD är att det är en helt icke-verbal behandling. I många fall med traumatisk stress, framförallt i början, så kan patienten ha svårt för att prata om vad som hände, inte vilja göra det, inte komma ihåg, eller helt enkelt ibland inte kunna nå minnena från händelsen alls. Öronakupunkturen kommer ändå att vara en enorm hjälp helt utan kommunikation om vad som hänt. Och efter behandlingen när patienten är mer avslappnad och känner sig fridfullare och tryggare, så är det också lättare att påbörja eller fortsätta eventuell samtalsterapi.
  En annan mycket praktisk del av öronakupunktur är att patienterna bara sätter sig ner på en stol, klädda i samma kläder och får behandlingen. Många med traumatiska upplevelser bakom sig kan ha en fobisk rädsla för att känna sig sårbara eller till och med bara lite maktlösa, och att sitta på en stol klädd som man brukar istället för att ligga halvklädd på ett behandlingsbord gör mycket stor skillnad för deras förmåga att känna att de har kontroll.

Här kan du se personal från Akupunktörer Utan Gränser (Acupuncturists Without Borders) ge NADA öronakupunktur under ett av sina projekt:




Tidsram för akupunkturbehandlingar för trauma och PTSD

Kom in för behandling så snabbt som möjligt. Samma sak gäller för kontakt med en terapeut. En bra vän att prata igenom det med är bra, men helst en terapeut som är tränad i hur man hanterar efterreaktionen på traumatisk stress och PTSD. Tänk på att om du har varit med om något mycket traumatiskt är det bättre att börja med en terapeut; om du pratar med en vän om det så kan du faktiskt skada vännen också, så var lite försiktig med deras hälsa. En mycket traumatisk händelse behöver ändå alltid kontakt med en professionell terapeut efteråt, helst någon tränad i hur man behandlar PTSD, vilket inte alla kan. Ju snabbare man får behandling desto mindre chock och problem från det stannar kvar i ens system. Ju längre vi väntar, desto större risk är det att händelserna går djupare i oss och börjar forma vår personlighet och hur vi ser omvärlden.

Öronakupunktur hjälper verkligen till med att släppa och slappna av en persons nervsystem, lugna ner deras sinne och ge dem en frid som de kan vara desperata efter att få. Akupunktur inom kinesisk medicin är mer komplett i att behandla hela systemet och djupare problem med hälsa, t. ex. om personen haft PTSD en längre period och det har slitit på deras sinne och hälsa under flera år. Öronakupunkturen har däremot fördelen att man kan behandla många patienter samtidigt, ibland upp till 10-20, beroende på hur mycket plats man har. Detta ger också patienterna ett stödnätverk av andra som de delat samma frid och samma behandling med.

Akupunktörer Utan Gränser grundades på den idén: grundaren Diana Fried såg tornadon Katrina slita sönder New Orleans och önskade att hon kunde hjälpa till på något sätt – tills hon insåg att det kunde hon, genom sina kunskaper i akupunktur. Hjälporganisationen har sedan dess behandlat 7000 personer i och runt New Orleans likaväl som oräkneligt antal veteraner, poliser, människor inblandade i naturkatastrofer över hela USA, och den hjälparbetarpersonal och statsanställda som arbetar för att hjälpa till i naturkatastroferna själva.

Bara en behandling kan göra stora skillnad om traumat skett nyligen, men annars är behandling av trauma och PTSD behandling över lång tid, och standardbehandlingen av sex gånger inom akupunktur i kinesisk medicin kommer sällan att räcka. Som vanligt kommer det att bero på patienten och deras hälsa. Akupunktören och deras klinik kommer ändå att finnas kvar där som en trygg punkt att återvända till, kanske om terapin blir tuff eller de har en dålig vecka; när de vet hur bra behandlingen fungerar ger det en extra trygghet i deras läkning.

En viktig sak att komma ihåg för patienten här är att ha en bra kontakt med en terapeut helst samtidigt som du har akupunkturbehandlingen, och givetvis gärna ha ett stödnätverk hos vänner och familj. Ibland kan man inte få det, men i allra bästa fall så finns det på plats. Och öronakupunktur kan användas mycket bra ihop med pågående terapi för trauma och PTSD.


Intentionen hos utövaren som behandlar trauma eller PTSD med akupunktur

Som utövare är det viktigt för oss att ha en stor mildhet när vi närmar oss någon som varit igenom traumatiska händelser eller som har PTSD sedan tidigare. Vi står framför någon som antagligen upplevt värre saker än vad någon människa vill, och vi har kunskapen och färdigheten att hjälpa fragmenten i dem att sakta bli helare igen. Även om vi skulle vilja formulera om det till att låta mer konkret än så, så står vi där och har färdigheten att ge dem friden de längtar så desperat efter, men ändå saknar förmågan att skapa för sig själv.

Kom ihåg att du kan behöva tala och röra dig lite annorlunda med någon som har PTSD, då de ofta är känsliga för yttre triggers – rörelser, ljud, vissa ord – på grund av vad de har varit med om. Tänk på att respektera detta, och var milt försiktigt medan du hjälper dem att läka sig igen.


 The junior physician treats the disease according to the condition of the body, while the senior physician treats the disease according to the condition of the spirit.”
                       - Huangdi Neijing Lingshu, The Yellow Emperor´s Classic of Internal Medicine, bok II, Spiritual Pivot, Chapter 1, Nine Needles and Twelve Yuan Source Points


Klassisk Kinesisk Medicin och synen på hur sinne påverkar kropp

Kinesisk medicin har behandlat problem i sinne och känslor minst sedan 300 f. Kr., då de första referenserna finns i text i den medicinska textboken som heter Huangdi Neijing, den Gule Kejsarens Klassiker om Inre Medicin, (se Wu och Wu, 1997).

För de utövare som är intresserade av diagnosmönsterna från moderniserad kinesisk medicin, TCM, så kan en översikt hittas i The Treatment of PTSD with Chinese Medicine – an integrative approach, (Chang et al., 2010). Klassisk Kinesisk Medicin (KKM) skulle ha en lite annorlunda behandlingsupplägg, men båda versionerna kan vara mycket effektiva i att hjälpa någon som varit med om traumatisk stress eller som ingår i den mindre gruppen som utvecklat PTSD under kortare eller längre tid.

Taoismen (Daojia), den andliga traditionen som kinesisk medicin har växt från och som har format den på många sätt, har också talat om att behandla sinne och känslor sedan minst 350 f. Kr. För de som vill fördjupa sina kunskaper i den fasetten och hur den ekar genom Neijing, Nanjing och Li Shizhens arbete med de Åtta Extraordinära meridianerna (för en modernare syn på detta, se Applied Channel Therapy of Chinese Medicine, Robertson och Wang, 2008) kan rekommenderas att också läsa det äldsta manuskriptet vi har från Taoismen, Neiye, the Classic of Internal Cultivation (Roth, 1999).

Lättare versioner av taoistisk kunskap har spridits i Väst genom qigong, Tai Chi och meditation. Studier och en hel del arbete har gjorts i hur man använder Tai Chi för att läka PTSD, och flera av de modaliteterna kan hjälpa till att stabilisera både fysisk kropp och stabilisera sinnet. Däremot rekommenderas att hitta en lärare som verkligen vet hur stresskador och specifikt traumatisk stress fungerar. En personlig beskrivning av läkning av grav PTSD genom den sortens träning kan du läsa i Vietnamveteranen Lee Burkins´s bok Soldier´s Heart.

Vissa utövare använder de så kallade guixue för att behandla PTSD – detta är Spökpunkterna som skrevs ner av Sun Simiao, en legendarisk akupunkturläkare och taoistisk mästare som levde under Tangdynastin (ca år 700). Detta, i min erfarenhet, är inte att rekommendera innan behandlingen gått ganska långt fram, men beror som vanligt alltid på patients hälsa och stabilitet. Spökpunkterna används för att släppa och frigöra oss från starkt känslomässigt skräp eller mentala låsningar, och det är viktigt att personen är stabil först, vilket någon med PTSD sällan är innan deras liv och hälsa blivit stabiliserat. Någon med grav PTSD kan vara hemskt bräcklig och behandlingar behöver vara varsamma för att bygga upp en stabil bas att arbeta från För en kort inblick i Spökpunkterna använda ihop med moxa, se Moxibustion: a modern clinical handbook, (Wilcox 2011).


Sammanfattning

Livet innehåller ibland erfarenheter som märker oss för hårt. Detta kan läkas mycket, vi kan bli helare igen; inte som vi var innan händelsen, för vad som än hänt så hände det. Däremot kan vi blir helare så att det inte påverkar vår vardag eller kontrollerar våra tankar: istället kan vi skapa en styrka från det som vi bygger vidare på och rör oss framåt med.

Öronakupunktur och akupunktur är ett sätt att hjälpa någon som är traumatiserad, eller någon som har utvecklat PTSD. Det är praktiskt, konkret och kräver inte att patienten säger någonting alls om situationen de var i och känslorna de har. Med öronakupunktur kan det också ges medan man sitter på en stol klädd i vanliga kläder. Utövaren sätter försiktigt in fem nålar i örat, mycket grunt, och sedan sitter man där i en halvtimme. Efter det reser man sig och tar med en helt ny frid och avslappning med sig ut i livet.

Om du har några frågor på den här artikeln eller om att behandla PTSD och trauma med akupunktur i kinesisk medicin eller öronakupunktur, så kan du kontakta mig på acu@smallchange.se. För källor, länkar och bibliografi, se nedan. För det lysande arbetet som Akupunktörer Utan Gränser gör inom det här fältet, se  http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/.

För varje nålsättning är metoden över alla andra att aldrig missa roten i sinnet.”
                - Rooted in Spirit, Chapter 8 of the Neijing, the Heart of Chinese Medicine, Larre and Rochat de la Vallée, Station Hill press 1995



Artiklar och länkar:




Acupuncturists Without Borders har nationella och internationella program för att läka och lösa upp traumatisk stress i patienter, veteraner och människor som har varit med om naturkatastrofer. De behandlar också regelbundet first responders, de som är ambulans- eller räddningspersonal och som går ut i katastrofområdena. Deras hemsida är http://www.acuwithoutborders.org/



Bibliografi och läslista


Mycket intressant papper om NGO security, säkerhet för hjälparbetare. Den här författaren anser att bra färdighet i Acceptance borde minska sannolikheten för PTSD i hjälparbetare och frivilliga.

Activist sustainability – hållbar hälsa för aktivister och frivilliga, Daniel Skyle, 2011, http://www.smallchange.se/activistsustainabilitydanielskyle,
Papper om activist sustainability, med en del jämförelser och riktlinjer för behandlingar och planering inom organisationerna som är ansvariga.

Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine, Robertson and Wang, Eastland Press, 2008
Lysande bok av en av våra lärare, citerad här för användningen av de Åtta Extraordinära meridianerna (qi jing ba mai) för att behandla känslor och nervsystem.

A war of nerves – soldiers and psychiatrists 1914-1994, Ben Shephard, Jonathan Cape, 2000
Historisk översikt över begreppet PTSD och hur militären har behandlat (eller ignorerat) PTSD sedan 1800-talet.

CARE International Safety and Security Handbook, CARE, 2004

Choke – the secret to performing under pressure, Sian Beilock, Constable&Robinson 2010

Episodes in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Bai Jingfeng, Panda Books, 1998
Inkluderar bra biografi över Sun Simiao, apropå hans Spökpunkter.

Extreme Fear – the science of your mind in danger, Jeff Wise, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010

Laughing Saints and Righteous Heroes: emotional rythm in social movement groups, Erika Effler, Morality and Science Series, 2010
En av de första böckerna om hur känslomässiga rytmer rör sig genom och förändrar grupper av frivilliga och hjälparbetare, med forskning på vilket tryck det sätter på deras hälsa och hur man kan bevara den, det som kallas activist sustainability.

NGO Security Conference 2010, with interview with anti-kidnapping specialist Suzanne Williams, Daniel Skyle, www.smallchangengosecurityblog.blogspot.com
Angående PTSD hos kidnappade hjälparbetare. För idéer runt behandling, utöver den här artikeln se också Activist sustainability – hållbar hälsa för aktivister och frivilliga, Daniel Skyle, 2011 http://www.smallchange.se/activistsustainabilitydanielskyle,

Moxibustion: a modern clinical handbook, Lorraine Wilcox, Blue Poppy Press, 2011

Nan-Ching, the Classic of Difficult Issues, Unschuld, University of California University Press, 1986

Neiye – Original Tao, Inward Training and the Foundations of Taoist Mysticism, Harold Roth, Columbia University Press, 1999.

NLP and Health, McDermott and O´Connor, Thorsons, 1996
Bra bok om hur man använder språk och formuleringar för att läka patienter och oss själva. Detta är extra viktigt när det gäller PTSD-patienter då de ofta är mycket känsliga för externa triggers, och de kan påverka deras hälsa djupt.

On Combat – the psychology and physiology of deadly conflict in war and in peace, Dave Grossman, PPCT Research Publications, 2004

Operational Security Management in Violent Environments, Brabant et al, Good Practice Review 8 Revised (GPR 8 R, uppdaterad version av GPR 8, 1999), 2011
Handbok i säkerhet för hjälparbetare, NGO security handbook, bland annat med kapitel som diskuterar tecken på stress och stresskador på grund av händelser i konfliktzoner och katastrofområden.

Perplexities to Acupuncture and Moxibustion – English- Chinese edition, Li Ding, Shanghai University of TCM Press, 2007
Inkluderar kapitel om att behandla sinnet, shen, i kinesisk medicin.

Posttraumatic stress disorder – a comprehensive text, Edited by Saigh, Bremner, Allyn and Bacon, 1999

Post-traumatic stress disorder: the chameleon of psychiatry, Larry Rosenbaum, Nord J Psychiatry Vol 58, no 5, 2004

Post traumatic stress disorder – the invisible injury, David Kinchin, Unlimited Success, new edition 2005
Bästa boken på marknaden för de som varit igenom traumatiska händelser eller utvecklat PTSD efter dem.

Soldier´s Heart, Lee Burkins, 2002
Självbiografi från någon som led av svår PTSD efter krig, och hans väg ut ur det för att läka det.

Sunzi´s Art of War and Health Care, Wu et al, New World Press, 1997
Flera kapitel om hur man behandlar sinnet och känslor, länkat till Sunzi´s kunskap om konflikt och krig.

Supporting Children with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – a practical guide for teachers and professionals, Brown and Kinchin, David Fulton Publisher, 2001
En enkel men mycket effektiv bok för de som arbetar med barn, inkluderat hur man ser trauma och PTSD i barn. Inkluderar råd om hur man hjälper dem att få hjälp och behandla det.

Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber, Jingui Yaloue, Zhang Zhongjing, Chinese-English edition, New World Press 2007

Talking to the Enemy, Scott Atran, HarperCollins, 2010

The Beautiful Tree, James Tooley, Cato Institute, 2009

The Gift of Fear, Gavin de Becker, Random House, 1997

The Psychological Health of Relief Workers: some practical suggestions, Salama, Humanitarian Exchange Magazine, 1999, http://www.odihpn.org/report.asp?id=1043

The Psychopath Test, Jon Ronson, Picador, 2011
Inkluderar kapitel om hur DSM skapades, med en del oroande information om den (i varje fall den tidiga) ojämnheten i hur man satte diagnostiska kriteria.

The Seven Emotions – psychology and health in ancient China, Larre and Rochat de la Vallée, Monkey Press, 1996

The Treatment of PTSD with Chinese Medicine – an integrative approach, Chang et al., People´s Medical Publishing House, 2010.
Första boken om hur man behandlar PTSD med modaliteter inom kinesisk medicin, med jämförelser med behandlingar inom västerländsk medicin. Skriven av Joe Chang som arbetar på Fort Bliss Restoration & Resilience Center William Beaumont Army Medical Center, US, Wang wei Dong som är överläkare och professor på Department of TCM psychology, Guang´anmen Hospital of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences i Beijing, China och Jiang Yong is Associate professor i kinesisk medicin, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China.
Intressant nog så inkluderar boken också fallstudier av PTSD-behandlingar på kinesiska sjukhus efter jordbävningen i Sichuan 2006.

The Yellow Emperor´s Canon of Internal Medicine, Chinese-English edition, Wu och Wu, China Science and Technology Press, 1997

Understanding post-traumatic stress – a psychosocial perspective on PTSD and treatment, Joseph et al, Wiley, 1997


Daniel Skyle © 2012. Copyrightat material.